Monograms Part II

Sticking with the monograms theme this month, we wanted to share some options for incorporating these on wedding stationery. Monograms are one of our favorite design elements to print. They add a decorative detail and a sophisticated elegance to wedding invitations. Plus, the design can be carried through all of the wedding stationery, from thank you note cards to programs and menus.

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We recommend couples adhere to traditional etiquette, noting that the bride’s initials come first on the stationery until the wedding has taken place. After the ceremony, the groom’s initials may come first (on the menu, escort cards and thank you notes) and/or the couple can use their shared last name, if relevant.

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Even simple initials like this L + A (below) can elevate items like escort cards or menus and give the stationery a personal feel.

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This couple opted for the nautical flags in lieu of letters.

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Monograms

Sticking with our “March Monogram” theme, we’ve added a couple new note card designs to our collection. We always love an elegant script monogram but for many people, this may feel too formal for their style of letter writing. A card with custom printed initials is going to get much more use.

If you’re inspired to order some monogramed stationery of your own, visit our note card collection here: Sesame Note Card Collection

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The simplicity of crisp, letterpressed initials always looks elegant. Monograms have been used for centuries from Roman era coins to modern era royal wedding invitations. We started looking into the history of monograms and here are some of the interesting things we learned:

  • Initials/monograms symbols have been used for centuries, dating back to 350 BC. 

  • Currency during Roman times featured the initials of the Greek and Roman rulers to mark their reign

  • In the Middle ages, artisans used initials to sign or brand their work

  • Early monograms consisted of just two initials. Around the 17th Century, it became more common to use the three letters. In the early 1600’s, Rembrandt signed his early paintings with “R” or “RH” but later added a third initial (and eventually moved on to signing his name).

  • British Royals use the 2 letters and these are intertwined to form a cipher, which is a monogram design for the reigning sovereign.

  • In the Victorian era, monograms were associated with the aristocracy and therefore, were perceived as a sign of prestige. 

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If initials feel too minimalist, a small illustration can be added to personalize the stationery a bit more. Here are a couple we’ve printed and love this month!

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